May 6, 2016

Photographing Toddlers in Their Natural Environment

When I started out doing photography, it was usually in a comedy context. I was either in the audience at my now-husband's shows taking photos, or getting my feet wet with headshot/portrait photos for comedians and an actor or two. 

After my son was born, friends' predictions that he would become "the most overphotographed child in history" came true pretty quickly. And before long, I started bringing my camera along on playdates, and taking photos of my kiddo's tiny pals as well. Obviously now I do lots of children and family photography, and I absolutely love it. Kids' birthday parties? I'm in! Your little boy's special portrait for his great-grandmother? I love it! The whole fam damily? I can do that, too. 

One thing I learned quickly while working with small children is that you cannot pose them. They do not care in the least that Mommy and Daddy booked a photographer and want a cute photo for their Christmas card. And why should they? Their main job is to play, explore their world, and learn social skills, both at home, and while playing with other kids. 
The best thing to do when photographing small children is to get them involved in an activity they love - playing in the park with a friend, painting on their easel, eating a special treat at a local cafe. I focus on creating a relaxed comfortable environment where the photography seems secondary. I speak to them the way I speak to my toddler - with a sweet tone, lots of affection, lots of silliness. They need to have fun! And I do whatever it takes to make that happen.

Often the kids even forget I'm there, and for help I occasionally ask for their mother or father to stand right over my shoulder to get their attention, so I can get some nice shots of them looking at (or close to!) the camera. 

The photos featured in this blog post are of my son's little pal S, who sadly has since moved away. My son still asks about her from time to time and he's a little bummed she's gone because they lived on our block and we enjoyed a lot of time together.

She and her mother met me and my son and husband at the nearby beachside playground and we ended up with a lovely, precious set of images of her playing and happy and enjoying herself. (Kudos to my husband for watching our child so I can photograph the other one! I can't do both things at the same time.)

Oh, and my other tip about photographing little ones: get on their level. Wear appropriate clothing such that you can work on the ground - crouching, kneeling, sometimes even lying flat - whatever it takes to get the right shot! Seeing them on their level and showing the world from their perspective can really freeze a moment in time that you'll cherish for the rest of your life.